Heritage Council Grant Awarded to The Herpetological Society of Ireland for Chytr
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Last updated: Sunday, April 22, 2012

Heritage Council Grant Awarded to The Herpetological Society of Ireland for Chytrid Fungus Study

 

The Importance of the Chytrid Study

Never before have amphibians been more threatened with extinction as they are now. The amphibian disease chytridiomicosis, caused by the pathogenic chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been implicated as a major cause of the global decline and extinction of amphibian species and populations.  13 countries in Europe have already been shown to harbour this pathogenic fungus with over 29 species currently known to have infected populations.

 

The Importance in Ireland and The Herpetological Society of Ireland

The island of Ireland is deemed to be one of the last “Chytrid free” places in Western Europe however this status is not based on scientific study.

To remedy this situation the Herpetological Society of Ireland, in collaboration with National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS), Zoological Society of London (ZSL), Invasive Species Ireland (ISI) and Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (ARC), with a generous grant from the Heritage Council, are to conduct the first ever survey of Irish amphibians to assess the status of the chytrid fungus in Ireland

Last November, Robert Gandola, H.S.I Senior Scientific Officer, submitted an application to the Heritage Council Grants Programme on behalf of the H.S.I.

The Herpetological Society of Ireland are pleased announce the success of this application and award of a Heritage Council Grant.

 

Your Help is Needed!

The H.S.I is in need of volunteer team leaders to lead swabbing teams in the following areas; Dublin,Galway,Cork and Belfast. Team leaders are required to undertake the swabbing of animals at locations identified as important to this study and supervise a team of volunteer assistants. Team leaders will have to apply for the appropriate licence(s) to permit the catching and swabbing of animals as scheduled under the Wildlife Act, 1976 and Wildlife (Amendment) Act, 2000 for the Republic of Ireland and The Wildlife (Northern Ireland ) Order, 1985 and Wildlife (Amendment) Order, 1995 for Northern Ireland.

Persons interested should contact Rob Gandola at science@thehsi.org
Ian Millichip
(Chairperson, The Herpetological Society of Ireland).